Interferometry on Earth

Interferometry on Earth

Currently, all existing gravitational-wave detectors are ground-based Michelson-type laser interferometers. The AEI is part of an international collaboration which runs the existing detectors: GEO600, the Virgo detector, and the LIGO detectors. The AEI laboratories house various experiments in this area. The institute also develops design concepts for future ground-based dectectors like the Einstein Telescope and tests new technologies using a small-scale prototype.

GEO600 is a gravitational-wave detector and a key technology development center of the international gravitational-wave research community. Technologies tested in the GEO project are now used in all large gravitational-wave detectors in the world. [more]
The Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) detector will eventually be more than ten times more sensitive, and over a much broader frequency band, than initial LIGO. The AEI is a partner in the aLIGO project and contributes the pre-stabilized laser system for all aLIGO detectors. Furthermore AEI scientists are involved in the commissioning and operation of the aLIGO interferometers. [more]
The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a design concept for a third-generation gravitational-wave (GW) detector, which will be 10 times more sensitive than the current advanced instruments of the second generation. [more]
The 10 m prototype interferometer is a test bed for new technologies of future laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. [more]
A good fraction of the more than 2000 square meter large laboratory space of the AEI is devoted to the experiments in the area of ground based interferometry. [more]
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