People

Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa
Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa
Group leader
Phone:+49 511 762-17160Fax:+49 511 762-17182
Email:papa@...

Personal homepage

Maximillian Bensch
Maximillian Bensch
Phone:+49 511 762-17183Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Dr. Vladimir Dergachev
Dr. Vladimir Dergachev
Christoph Dreißigacker
Christoph Dreißigacker
Phone:+49 511 762-5702Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein
Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein
Phone:+49 511 762-17098Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Liudmila Fesik
Liudmila Fesik
Phone:+49 511 762-17190Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Iuri La Rosa
Iuri La Rosa
Phone:+49 511 762-17187Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Bernd Machenschalk
Bernd Machenschalk
Phone:+49 511 762-19463Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Dr. Jing Ming
Dr. Jing Ming
Phone:+49 511 762-17190Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Dr. Arunava Mukherjee
Dr. Arunava Mukherjee
Phone:+49 511 762-17153Fax:+49 511 762-2784

Member of Observational Relativity and Cosmology

Dr. Reinhard Prix
Dr. Reinhard Prix
Phone:+49 511 762-17154Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Rahul Sharma
Rahul Sharma
Phone:+49 511 762-3437Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Dr. Avneet Singh
Dr. Avneet Singh
Phone:+49 511 762-17150Fax:+49 511 762-2784

Persönliche Homepage

Divya Singh
Divya Singh
Benjamin Steltner
Benjamin Steltner
Dr. Yuanhao Zhang
Dr. Yuanhao Zhang
Phone:+49 511 762-17004Fax:+49 511 762-2784
Dr. Sylvia Zhu
Dr. Sylvia Zhu
Phone:+49 511 762-17169Fax:+49 511 762-2784

Searching for Continuous Gravitational Waves

The primary goal of this permanent independent research group is to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars, and thus to observe these stars via a completely different physical mechanism, which would carry important new information about their internal structure and composition.

Neutron stars, the targets of this research program, are extreme objects formed in supernova explosions. They typically have around 40 % more mass than the Sun, but are only about 20 kilometers in diameter: the only objects that are known to be more compact than this are black holes. Until now, the vast majority of neutron stars have been found via the pulsations that result from their beamed electromagnetic emission periodically sweeping past the Earth; for this reason they are often called pulsars. However, while it is believed that the Milky Way contains about a hundred million neutron stars, fewer than 3000 have been detected so far. Gravitational waves might well be the only way to unveil this invisible population of extreme objects.

In 2016, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration announced the first direct observations of short bursts of gravitational waves, emitted during the inspiral and merger of black holes of tens of solar masses. Here we target a different type of gravitational wave signal: the long continuous waveform expected from a rapidly spinning neutron star. Because the star's sky location, spin rate, and deformation from axisymmetry are unknown, there is a large parameter space to search, and the sensitivity is limited by the amount of computing power available. The Einstein@Home volunteer computing project provides the lion's share of our compute cycles and on it we deploy our state-of-the-art search techniques.

The direct detection of gravitational waves has opened a new window on the Universe, providing a new tool for astrophysical observation. The detection of continuous gravitational waves will provide glimpses in the invisible population of neutron stars that inhabits our Galaxy, improve our understanding of stellar evolution and populations and shed light on the internal structure and evolutionary history on these extraordinary objects.

Recently submitted papers

1.
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration
Full Band All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the O1 LIGO Data
2.
G. Ashton and R. Prix
Hierarchical multi-stage MCMC follow-up of continuous gravitational wave candidates
3.
G. Ashton, D. I. Jones, R. Prix
Advances in our understanding of the free precession candidate PSR B1828-11
4.
G. Ashton et al.
Coincident detection significance in multimessenger astronomy

Recently published papers

5.
A. Mukherjee, C. Messenger, and K. Riles
Accretion-induced spin-wandering effects on the neutron star in Scorpius X-1: Implications for continuous gravitational wave searches
6.
G. D. Meadors, B. Krishnan, M. A. Papa, J. T. Whelan, Y. Zhang
Resampling to accelerate cross-correlation searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems
7.
J. Ming, M. A. Papa, B. Krishnan, R. Prix, C. Beer, S. J. Zhu, H.-B. Eggenstein, O. Bock, B. Machenschalk
Optimally setting up directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO O1 data
8.
S. J. Zhu, M. A. Papa, S. Walsh
A new veto for continuous gravitational wave searches
9.
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration
First low-frequency Einstein@Home all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO data
10.
A. Singh, M. A. Papa, H.-B. Eggenstein, S. Walsh
An adaptive clustering procedure for continuous gravitational wave searches
11.
G. Ashton, R. Prix, D. I. Jones
Statistical characterization of pulsar glitches and their potential impact on searches for continuous gravitational waves
12.
LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration
All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the O1 LIGO data
13.
D. I. Jones, G. Ashton, and R. Prix
Implications of the Occurrence of Glitches in Pulsar Free Precession Candidates
14.
Grant David Meadors, Evan Goetz, Keith Riles, Teviet Creighton, Florent Robinet
Searches for continuous gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO's sixth science run
15.
Avneet Singh
Gravitational wave transient signal emission via Ekman pumping in neutron stars during post-glitch relaxation phase
16.
G. Ashton, D. I. Jones, and R. Prix
On the free-precession candidate PSR B1828-11: Evidence for increasing deformation
17.
M.A. Papa et al.
Hierarchical follow-up of sub-threshold candidates of an all-sky Einstein@home search for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO S6 data
18.
Karl Wette

Empirically extending the range of validity of parameter-space metrics for all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

19.
Sinead Walsh et al.
A comparison of methods for the detection of gravitational waves from unknown neutron stars
20.
LIGO Scientific Collaboration
Results of the deepest all-sky survey for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO S6 data running on the Einstein at Home volunteer distributed computing project
21.
Sylvia J. Zhu et al.
Results of the deepest Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves from CasA from the S6 LIGO Science Run
22.
Avneet Singh et al.
Results of an all-sky high-frequency Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves in LIGO 5th Science Run
23.
Grant David Meadors, Evan Goetz, and Keith Riles
Tuning into Scorpius X-1: adapting a continuous gravitational-wave search for a known binary system
24.
David Keitel
Robust semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves with noise and signal models including hours to days long transients
25.
Jing Ming, Badri Krishnan, Maria Alessandra Papa, Carsten Aulbert, and Henning Fehrmann
Optimal directed searches for continuous gravitational waves
26.
Miroslav Shaltev
Optimizing StackSlide setup and data selection for continuous-gravitational-wave searches in realistic detector data
27.
G. Ashton, D. I. Jones, and R. Prix
Comparing models of the periodic variations in spin-down and beamwidth for PSR B1828-11
 
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