2015

Enormous amounts of energy are released when a massive star, many times heavier than our Sun, collapses. Some stars explode in a hypernova - ten times more powerful than a normal supernova - and may emit a high-energy gamma-ray burst. Until now it was not clear how the extremely strong magnetic field needed for these processes is generated. A research team in the US, in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam, now published an elaborate three-dimensional computer simulation, which sheds light on the relationship between hypernova, supernova, and gamma-ray bursts.

What Powers the Explosion of Stars?

November 30, 2015

Enormous amounts of energy are released when a massive star, many times heavier than our Sun, collapses. Some stars explode in a hypernova - ten times more powerful than a normal supernova - and may emit a high-energy gamma-ray burst. Until now it was not clear how the extremely strong magnetic field needed for these processes is generated. A research team in the US, in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam, now published an elaborate three-dimensional computer simulation, which sheds light on the relationship between hypernova, supernova, and gamma-ray bursts. [more]
On, Friday, September 18th 2015, the first official 'observing run' (O1) of the advanced LIGO detectors in the USA began when the clock struck 8 a.m. Pacific time. While this date marks the official start of data collection, both interferometers have been operating in engineering mode taking data for some weeks already as technicians, scientists, and engineers worked to refine the instrument to prepare it for official observation duties. The GEO600 gravitational-wave detector operated by the Albert Einstein Institute (AEI) together with UK partners near Hannover, Germany, is taking data simultaneously with the LIGO detectors.

Advanced LIGO detectors begin first observation run

September 18, 2015

On, Friday, September 18th 2015, the first official 'observing run' (O1) of the advanced LIGO detectors in the USA began when the clock struck 8 a.m. Pacific time. While this date marks the official start of data collection, both interferometers have been operating in engineering mode taking data for some weeks already as technicians, scientists, and engineers worked to refine the instrument to prepare it for official observation duties. The GEO600 gravitational-wave detector operated by the Albert Einstein Institute (AEI) together with UK partners near Hannover, Germany, is taking data simultaneously with the LIGO detectors. [more]
Albert Einstein Institute researchers make key contributions to advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detectors

A large step closer to the first direct detection of gravitational waves

May 18, 2015

Albert Einstein Institute researchers make key contributions to advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detectors

[more]
Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa, research group leader in the "Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity" division at the Albert Einstein Institute, has been elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). This honor is bestowed only on half a percent of the 50,000 APS members. It recognizes the awardee's outstanding contributions to physics.

Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa elected Fellow of the American Physical Society

January 20, 2015

Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa, research group leader in the "Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity" division at the Albert Einstein Institute, has been elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). This honor is bestowed only on half a percent of the 50,000 APS members. It recognizes the awardee's outstanding contributions to physics. [more]
Neutron star collisions are extreme events: the evidence points towards them being the origin of short gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The burst is most likely produced when the massive object formed in the collision collapses to a black hole. However, satellites often detect not only the extremely short gamma-ray burst, but also a subsequent strong emission of X-rays, lasting several hours or more, that cannot be explained by the very short activity of the newly-formed black hole. In a recent publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters AEI scientists propose an explanation for this apparent inconsistency. The explanation involves a time reversal in the production and observation of the gamma-ray and (part of the) X-ray signals. It also opens up new possibilities for multimessenger astronomy.

It ain't Magic: "Time-reversal" in Neutron Star Collisions

January 29, 2015

Neutron star collisions are extreme events: the evidence points towards them being the origin of short gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The burst is most likely produced when the massive object formed in the collision collapses to a black hole. However, satellites often detect not only the extremely short gamma-ray burst, but also a subsequent strong emission of X-rays, lasting several hours or more, that cannot be explained by the very short activity of the newly-formed black hole. In a recent publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters AEI scientists propose an explanation for this apparent inconsistency. The explanation involves a time reversal in the production and observation of the gamma-ray and (part of the) X-ray signals. It also opens up new possibilities for multimessenger astronomy. [more]
 
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