Project Partners

Cooperations

The division Observational Relativity and Cosmology closely cooperates with different institutions and research groups worldwide.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

The majority of the work in our group is part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration. This international collaboration coordinates the efforts geared towards the first direct detection of gravitational waves by ground-based interferometric detectors.

PALFA Consortium

The distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home analyzes data from the Arecibo Radio Telescope, acquired by the PALFA Consortium. The international consortium coordinates the data acquisition and data analysis of large-scale survey observations using the Arecibo Radio Telescope – the PALFA survey. Our group closely collaborates with the PALFA Consortium to ensure the best-possible and fastest analysis of the observational data.

Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

Our gamma-ray pulsar group analyzes data from the Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope for weak signals from faint gamma-ray pulsars. Employing newly-developed search methods inspired by gravitational-wave searches, several exciting discoveries have been made. The Einstein@Home project also analyzes data from the Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope for weak signals from rapidly-rotating, faint gamma-ray pulsars.

LSC group, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Our group is closely connected to the LSC group at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Bruce Allen holds a position as adjunct professor in the LSC group at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Maria Alessandra Papa is an adjunct senior scientist in the same group.

Fundamental Physics in Radio Astronomy Group at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn

Our division closely collaborates with Prof. Dr. Michael Kramers group for Fundamental Physics in Radio Astronomy Group at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn. Common projects include the search for unknown gamma-ray pulsars in data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and searches for new radio pulsars in data from the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Effelsberg 100-meter Radio Telescope.

Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC)

The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing, BOINC provides the framework for the distributed computing project Einstein@Home. Members from our group contribute to the developement of BOINC.

 
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